leaderboard-ad

Facebook
Pinterest
Instagram
YouTube
LinkedIn
Follow by Email

Celebrating Modern Jewish Living Through Food, Tradition, and Family

Scalloped Potatoes

The Backstory: This is my version of Scalloped Potatoes.  I could eat this for 3 meals a day and never tire of it.  It is creamy, very tasty  and just mouth watering. Not many people would go gaga over potatoes, but I would. I started making this kind of potatoes when I got bored with boiled, baked or fried potatoes. More of the Backstory after the recipe

Scalloped Potatoes as seen on The Jewish Kitchen website

Scallop Potatoes

Course: Brunch, Lunch, Main Dish
Cuisine: French
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes
Servings: 4 people
I like to use a large pie plate to bake and serve the scallop potatoes. It is very pleasing to the eye. Most people eat with their eyes before their mouths. This is easy to prepare with most ingredients that cooks have in their pantry. Enjoy the crunch on top and indulge with the creamy filling inside.
Print This Recipe

Ingredients

  • 4 large potatoes peeled and sliced into 1/4 inch rounds
  • 4-6 ounces unsalted butter You may need more
  • 1/2 + cup grated Parmesan cheese You may need more
  • Kosher salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/2+ cup Whole milk

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Grease a large glass pie dish or other kind of baking dish with a little butter to coat bottom of pan.
  3. Layer sliced potatoes.
  4. Cut butter into small pieces. Dot on potatoes.
  5. Sprinkle on grated cheese and salt and pepper.
  6. Repeat layers.
  7. Pour milk into a cup with a spout. Pour around the sides of the dish until it reaches about 1/3 up the sides.
  8. Bake uncovered 35-45 minutes. Do not let the top layer burn. It should look brown and crispy, when done. Put a toothpick in to check for softness of the potatoes.

…The Backstory continues:  My husband liked this because of the crunchy top and the creamy filling. To me potatoes are comfort food.  I was raised on meat and potatoes.  It didn’t matter what was served, you could always count on mashed potatoes to be a side dish.  My mom’s potatoes were usually lumpy and not very tasty, except for the salt.  I was determined never to serve lumpy potatoes, and if I do say so, I make it without lumps, creamy and tasty. I started making these scalloped potatoes early in my marriage. Everyone who had them usually requested that I would serve them again when they visited. I did and I would come up with different types of a main dish and side. But no matter what I made these potatoes were the first to be devoured.

Please follow and like us:
Scalloped Potatoes as seen on The Jewish Kitchen website
Scalloped Potatoes as seen on The Jewish Kitchen website
Scalloped Potatoes as seen on The Jewish Kitchen website
Scalloped Potatoes as seen on The Jewish Kitchen website
Scalloped Potatoes as seen on The Jewish Kitchen website
Scalloped Potatoes as seen on The Jewish Kitchen website
Scalloped Potatoes as seen on The Jewish Kitchen website

Myrna Turek

I'm a domestic goddess who got my 'PhD' in Home Ec in the early 1960s. I was married for 52 years and have six grandchildren. If it were up to me, everything would be fried. Including chocolate.
Scalloped Potatoes as seen on The Jewish Kitchen website

Latest posts by Myrna Turek (see all)

Facebook
Pinterest
Instagram
YouTube
LinkedIn
Follow by Email

Subscribe to
TheJewishKitchen Newsletter

Sign up for our FREE newsletter
Recipes, stories, and Inspiration for the Jewish home
RECIPE IDEAS FOR HOLIDAYS AND EVERY DAY